Category Archives: 2016-17 Season

How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part Three

Edric Dennis is one of the many small school stars who would be showcasing their talents on a much-larger scene if players stayed closer to home. (Source: Jackson State Sports | Twitter)

CALGARY, Alta. — In recent years, the importance of recruiting in college basketball can’t be stressed enough. Players travel all across the country, and the world, to play basketball at any one of the 351 Division I institutions.

But, what if that wasn’t the case? What if players had to play as close to their home state as possible?

That’s what we asked ourselves, and we wanted to see what the rosters would look like if that was the case.

So, we went through each and every team’s roster after the 2016-17 season came to an end, and a list of over 5,200 names was compiled. With it being alphabetized by state and hometown, we went to work.

Here’s how players were assigned to their respective rosters:

  • First, any player from a respective university town was automatically placed on that team. (EX: Divine Myles is from Mobile, AL, therefore placed on the roster for the South Alabama Jaguars).
  • Second, any player from the state that was on a team’s roster in that state was placed on their original team. (EX: Miles Bridges hails from Flint, MI, but played for the Michigan State Spartans, thus he returned to their roster.)
  • Third, any remaining players from a respective state were split up to the teams in the state, with an effort to provide a mix of under and upperclassmen, as well as guards and forwards.
  • Next, if there were any slots open on teams after all of the players born in the USA were off the board from a particular state,  teams could draw from other states. However, they could only draw from states that directly bordered themselves. (EX: teams in Alabama could only draw from teams in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, and Mississippi).
  • Next, once all of the USA born players were gone, the process moved to Canada. Only states that bordered Canada could have Canadians on their roster.
  • And finally, the International players. Any team that still had holes on their roster would be filled with players from anywhere outside of North America.

All teams have between 13 and 16 players, with the final number based on the availability of players in a certain area of the country.

We googled each and every university, and used the city name that came up on the school’s academic website.

With 351 teams and over 5,200 players, the list has been broken down into three parts. You can find links to Parts One and Two at the bottom of Part Three.

Without further ado, let’s see how your favourite team would look if players had to play as close to home as possible. Continue reading How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part Three

How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part Two

The Kentucky Wildcats would look nothing like the teams we’ve seen recently, and a pair of their stars would find themselves on some unexpected rosters, including Isaiah Briscoe. (Source: CBS Sports)

CALGARY, Alta. — In recent years, the importance of recruiting in college basketball can’t be stressed enough. Players travel all across the country, and the world, to play basketball at any one of the 351 Division I institutions.

But, what if that wasn’t the case? What if players had to play as close to their home state as possible?

That’s what we asked ourselves, and we wanted to see what the rosters would look like if that was the case.

So, we went through each and every team’s roster after the 2016-17 season came to an end, and a list of over 5,200 names was compiled. With it being alphabetized by state and hometown, we went to work.

Here’s how players were assigned to their respective rosters:

  • First, any player from a respective university town was automatically placed on that team. (EX: Divine Myles is from Mobile, AL, therefore placed on the roster for the South Alabama Jaguars).
  • Second, any player from the state that was on a team’s roster in that state was placed on their original team. (EX: Miles Bridges hails from Flint, MI, but played for the Michigan State Spartans, thus he returned to their roster.)
  • Third, any remaining players from a respective state were split up to the teams in the state, with an effort to provide a mix of under and upperclassmen, as well as guards and forwards.
  • Next, if there were any slots open on teams after all of the players born in the USA were off the board from a particular state,  teams could draw from other states. However, they could only draw from states that directly bordered themselves. (EX: teams in Alabama could only draw from teams in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, and Mississippi).
  • Next, once all of the USA born players were gone, the process moved to Canada. Only states that bordered Canada could have Canadians on their roster.
  • And finally, the International players. Any team that still had holes on their roster would be filled with players from anywhere outside of North America.

All teams have between 13 and 16 players, with the final number based on the availability of players in a certain area of the country.

We googled each and every university, and used the city name that came up on the school’s academic website.

With 351 teams and over 5,200 players, the list has been broken down into three parts. You can find links to Parts One and Three at the bottom of Part Two.

Without further ado, let’s see how your favourite team would look if players had to play as close to home as possible. Continue reading How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part Two

How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part One

Lonzo Ball to California? Jaron Blossomgame to Georgia? Stars would be on some unlikely teams if players had to play closer to home in the NCAA. (Source: Sporting News)

CALGARY, Alta. — In recent years, the importance of recruiting in college basketball can’t be stressed enough. Players travel all across the country, and the world, to play basketball at any one of the 351 Division I institutions.

But, what if that wasn’t the case? What if players had to play as close to their home state as possible?

That’s what we asked ourselves, and we wanted to see what the rosters would look like if that was the case.

So, we went through each and every team’s roster after the 2016-17 season came to an end, and a list of over 5,200 names was compiled. With it being alphabetized by state and hometown, we went to work.

Here’s how players were assigned to their respective rosters:

  • First, any player from a respective university town was automatically placed on that team. (EX: Divine Myles is from Mobile, AL, therefore placed on the roster for the South Alabama Jaguars).
  • Second, any player from the state that was on a team’s roster in that state was placed on their original team. (EX: Miles Bridges hails from Flint, MI, but played for the Michigan State Spartans, thus he returned to their roster.)
  • Third, any remaining players from a respective state were split up to the teams in the state, with an effort to provide a mix of under and upperclassmen, as well as guards and forwards.
  • Next, if there were any slots open on teams after all of the players born in the USA were off the board from a particular state,  teams could draw from other states. However, they could only draw from states that directly bordered themselves. (EX: teams in Alabama could only draw from teams in Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, and Mississippi).
  • Next, once all of the USA born players were gone, the process moved to Canada. Only states that bordered Canada could have Canadians on their roster.
  • And finally, the International players. Any team that still had holes on their roster would be filled with players from anywhere outside of North America.

All teams have between 13 and 16 players, with the final number based on the availability of players in a certain area of the country.

We googled each and every university, and used the city name that came up on the school’s academic website.

With 351 teams and over 5,200 players, the list has been broken down into three parts. You can find links to Parts Two and Three at the bottom of Part One.

Without further ado, let’s see how your favourite team would look if players had to play as close to home as possible. Continue reading How would rosters look if players stayed closer to home: Part One

Fans select College Court Report Player of the Year for third straight season

Mark Alstork was looking to ride the momentum from the past six weeks to the Player of the Year crown, while North Dakota’s Quinton Hooker was looking to win back-to-back Player of the Year awards.
CALGARY, Alta. — The 2016-17 season may be all but a distant memory for most fans across the country, but there was still plenty to be excited about for fans of both the North Dakota Fighting Hawks and the Wright State Raiders.

The third annual College Court Report Player of the Year Fan Vote was in its final week, as the initial field of 96 players had been cut down to just two. Quinton Hooker was matched up with Mark Alstork in the finale, capping off a seven-week journey to name the Player of the Year.

Last year, Hooker was named the CCR Player of the Year, knocking off Damon Lynn in the final round. This time around, fans of North Dakota had a heavy presence on social media, as well as the online polls. As the weeks have gone on, the support system behind Hooker had picked up steam, and he was looking to build on that in the final week.

On the flip side, a heavy dose of social media votes over the first six weeks propelled Alstork into the finals. After a tough battle with guard DeWayne Russell in the semi-finals, Alstork was looking to knock off the reigning Player of the Year.

Both players saw an out-pouring of support over the past seven days across all three voting platforms, but only one could come out on top.

After seven weeks, and over 190,000 votes, the 2016-17 College Court Report Player of the Year is…… Continue reading Fans select College Court Report Player of the Year for third straight season

College Court Report Freshman of the Year Fan Vote: Second Round Results

For the second year in a row, Abilene Christian is out in full force to support their freshman, and Jalone Friday is one of the early front-runners in this year’s challenge.

CALGARY, Alta. — The post-season is in full swing across the NCAA.

All four post-season brackets have been released, and there are several big games on tap for this week, starting as early as Monday night with the opener in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament.

Our Player of the Year and Freshman of the Year Fan Voted awards are also in full swing. Round Two in both votes concluded Sunday night, and the Third Round begins on March 13th.

Over the last seven days, last week’s victors in the Freshman of the Year Fan Vote were back at it, looking to garner more support to advance to the next round. Several of last week’s front-runners continued to roll, while the contest said goodbye to one of the top vote-getters after going up against last week’s top vote-getter.

In total, 22,932 votes were cast between the online polls, Twitter, and Facebook over the past seven days.

Below, you can find the results for the 16 match-ups from this past week. Continue reading College Court Report Freshman of the Year Fan Vote: Second Round Results

College Court Report Player of the Year Fan Vote: Second Round Results

For the second week in a row ,Quinton Hooker was the top vote-getter in the College Court Report Player of the Year Fan Vote. (Source: Russell Hons – North Dakota Basketball)

CALGARY, Alta. — The post-season is in full swing across the NCAA.

All four post-season brackets have been released, and there are several big games on tap for this week, starting as early as Monday night with the opener in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament.

Our Player of the Year and Freshman of the Year Fan Voted awards are also in full swing. Round Two in both votes concluded Sunday night, and the Third Round begins on March 13th.

This past week, the 32 players who received a first-round bye started to campaign for votes to help them come away with the Player of the Year award. Some were successful, while some players who had an extra week under their belts kept their positive momentum rolling.

In total, 23,647 votes were cast between the online polls, Twitter, and Facebook over the past seven days.

Below, you can find the results for the 32 match-ups from this past week.
Continue reading College Court Report Player of the Year Fan Vote: Second Round Results